Travel Trailer Covers – Buying the Right One

With all of the excitement of purchasing a new camper, the thought of protecting it when not in use may be overlooked. Since your camper may be such a large investment, you should do everything you can protect it. Travel trailer covers are probably the least expensive way to protect you camper. From the damaging UV rays from the sun, dirt and dust, heavy rain fall and freezing winter weather (for some of us), having your camper covered with a quality RV cover is one way you can ensure your camper is protected and extended its life.

When you’re shopping for RV trailer covers, it is important to know the right size to buy to make sure you have a good fit. Just because your owner’s manual says that it is a 29 foot camper doesn’t mean that it actually is! You will want to measure the camper for yourself. When you go to measure your camper you are going to measure from end to end. Start at the furthest point of the camper at the rear of your camper. Be sure to include the ladder, bumper or spare tire. Measure to the front of the camper but do not include the propane tanks or hitching. If you have a roof air, be sure to add an addition one foot to the final measurement. Now that you have your measurements, you are ready to start your search for travel trailer covers.

One important feature to consider is your climate. If you climate is damp, it is especially important to consider travel trailer covers that “breath”. Tyvek Travel Trailer Covers are made with Polypropylene sides to ensure maximum breathability and it virtually eliminates mold and mildew. Its two layer Tyvek top panel resists water and allows trapped moisture to evaporate from within. UV protection is also very important in all climates.

Other features to consider are the travel trailer covers straps and buckle attachments to prevent billowing on windy days, reinforced corners to resist tears and heavy duty zipper “doors” for easy access to your travel trailer while it is covered. Many brands of travel trailer covers are being designed with many zippers to allow access to your camper no matter where the entrance door is located.

Since travel trailer covers will be exposed to the elements, they will weaken over time. You will want to find a cover that has a good warranty. These covers are going to protect your investment so you will want to make sure that it is of good quality and will last for many seasons. It is important to know how long the warranty is and what the warranty covers.

When you have decided on the brand and type of travel trailer covers that you are going to purchase, you will have to choose the cover size. If you are sure that you have measured correctly, now you will need to locate the size that is closest to your measurement. RV covers are made to fit a size range like 24’1″ to 26″. Find the range that is closest to you measurement. It is better for it to be a little bigger than it is for it to be a little too small. If it is too small, you will have to stretch the material to fit with can cause unnecessary strain to the cover. Besides, most of the better made travel trailer covers allow you to tighten up the corners and edges to make for a better fit.

You have made a wise choice in considering protecting your camper with a cover. Whether you are storing your camper indoors or outdoors, travel trailer covers will keep you camper cleaner and in better condition which will extend the life of your camper as well as keeping the resale value higher if you should choose to sell or trade in your travel trailer.

Green Travel Plan Advice

A Green Travel Plan should deliver economic, practical and easy to manage measures both now and in the future. The majority of individuals that usually require a green travel plan are commercial developers and businesses. A plan should typically be:

  • economic to implement ‘day one’
  • cost effective for future management
  • include practical, well thought out measures that work

What’s the difference between Green and Workplace travel plans?

A Green Travel Plan (also typically known as a Workplace Travel Plan) is an obligation imposed by local authorities through the planning process typically by way of panning condition attached to a planning consent or by a S.106 agreement. It may also be introduced as a requirement during the application process.

In addition a Travel Plan is often a requirement of a BREEAM assessment process.

The Green Travel Plan sets out a suite of actions and measures intended to promote travel to the site by sustainable transport methods such as bicycle, bus or train rather than private car.

So I have a Green Travel Plan, what happens if I don’t follow it?

Most local authorities will require occupiers to monitor the effectiveness of the plan to ensure measures are being implemented and targets set in the plan are being met. The aim should be to demonstrate ongoing improvement.

Some local authorities now have sustainable travel officers whose sole duty is to promote sustainable travel and to monitor plans to ensure compliance.

Ultimately the local authority does have the power to take Enforcement action against you if you are not implementing and monitoring your plan. The council has the power to issue of a breach of condition notice to require you to comply with the requirements which could ultimately lead to prosecution and fine if you still fail to comply.

What Actions and Measures do the plans typically include?

They are sometimes produced to include high cost and complicated measures such as staff showers, public transport information and ticketing systems, subsidised public transport, cycle parking and staff loan schemes. Whilst it’s important to be mindful of the commercial necessity to obtain a consent, more simpler and cost effective measures should be considered as well, such as; free internet access to travel guides; website links to local travel information; car sharing schemes and on site maps of bus and train stations.

A plan should be produced to minimise the cost to the clients of delivering their plan whilst balancing this against the local planning policy requirements and need for a consent in a timely manner.

What will my Green Travel Plan cost?

Every plan is different based on the local policy requirements, the site constraints and the commercial pressures. Each should ideally be produced on a site specific basis. It is important to appreciate that a well considered and written plan allied to skilled consultants negotiating terms with the local authority will save you more money than you will ever spend on preparing it. Conversely, one poorly written will cost you money ‘day one’ and for many years to come as you continue to spend money and management time on costly and unwieldy measures.

Travel in Fantasy – How Fast Can They Get There?

If you don’t take the time to approximate the time and distance your characters take from point A to point B, you risk inconsistencies which your detail-oriented readers will pick up on. You don’t want your troupe leaving too late to realistically catch the festival in the next town, or save their friend from his scheduled execution in the next kingdom. If you find they would be arriving too early, you can always throw obstacles in their way to slow them down.

Before you can calculate distance, you need a scaled map. A scale is a measurement showing how many inches/millimeters represent a number of miles. My own map scale: 1 inch = 100 miles. Now that you have your scale, you can begin measuring. Rarely do you want to measure the direct distance however – roads curve, adventurers have to backtrack, or a lake crosses their path. An easy trick is to use a piece of string or floss instead of a straight edged paper or ruler. You can curve the string along the exact path, cut it off, pull it straight and then measure it.

Now that you have the distance, you can begin to figure out time. Even if you don’t show the traveling itself, you need to have a sense of how much time has passed. What transportation method are they using? Walking, riding horses, wagon, ship, or some more fantastical method? Or in a modern fantasy: by car, plane, train? Here’s a handy reference chart for some of the most common means. All measurements are miles/hour (mph) unless noted otherwise.

Horses
Horse speed varies by breed, stride, and condition, but here’s an average.

Walk: 3-5 mph

Trot: roughly 8-10 mph

Canter/Lope: 10-17 mph

Gallop: about 30 mph

Human travel (all assuming character is in average condition)

on dirt trails: 10-14 miles/day

on paved trails: 8-12 miles/day (no natural cushioning for feet)

on fair trails (natural, rocky, root covered, etc): 8-12 miles/day

average speed over natural terrain: 3 mph

Wagon

Ox-drawn: 16 miles/day

average wagon travel: 2 mph

exhaustive wagon travel: 6 mph

Ship

This varies greatly on ship type, weather, etc. The general answer would be 4 – 5 mph, but I urge you to do more specific research if you have much sea travel.

Transporting Information, not people

Passenger pigeons are able to fly over 60 mph

Keep in mind that the harder, faster speeds are difficult to keep up at long distances and will require more rest periods (non-man-powered vehicles being the exception).

If you use more modern transportation, you’ll want to research for the specific region and era. Also be sure to note the speeds of any travel means you’ve specifically created for your world.

How do I use this information?

If you have a distance and want to know how long it takes to travel, divide the distance by mph. You can figure out how far someone will journey in one day by multiplying the mph by the number of hours they travel. If your characters are on the move a lot, make a string in the length of their average daily travel so you can mark on the map where they end each day.

This is information that isn’t easy to locate through general searches, though the information is out there. I hope you find it useful.